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375 Printers Pkwy
Colorado Springs, CO 80910
Phone: 719-385-5950
Email: CSFDWeb@springsgov. . .
Hours: Headquarters 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Support Services 8:00 a.m. - Noon and 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.





City of Colorado Springs / Fire / Media Resources / Glossary of Terms



A Post
Accelerants
Accidental fire
Accidental
Accountability system
Advanced life support (ALS)
Aerial fuel
Aerial ladder
Alarm notification device
Alarm valve
Arson
Automatic sprinkler heads

B posts
Backdraft
Balloon-frame construction
Basic life support (BLS)
Battalion chief
Bowstring trusses

C posts
Class I standpipe
Class II standpipe
Class III standpipe
Class A fire
Class B fire
Class C fire
Class D fire
Cold zone
Conflagration

Deck gun
Deluge head
Diking
Dry-barrel hydrant

Emergency Medical Technician
Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic
Engine Company
Exposure

Fuel
Fuel moisture

Heavy fuels
Hot zone

Incendiary fire
Incendiary device

Level A protection
Level B protection
Level C protection
Level D protection

NFPA

Overhaul

Shelter-in-place
Size-up
Surface fuels

Target hazard
Type I construction
Type II construction
Type III construction
Type IV construction
Type V construction

Warm Zone

A Post
Vertical support members that form the sides of the windshield.

Accelerants
Materials, usually flammable liquids, used to initiate or increase the spread of fire.

Accidental fire
A fire ignited by any means without deliberation.

Accidental
Fire cause classification that includes fires with a proven cause that does not involve a deliberate human act.

Accountability system
A method of accounting for all personnel at an emergency incident and ensuring that only personnel with specific assignments are permitted to work within the various zones.

Advanced life support (ALS)
Advanced lifesaving procedures, such as cardiac monitoring, administration of IV fluids and medications, and use of advanced airway adjuncts.

Aerial fuel
Fuels more that six feet off the ground, usually part of or attached to trees.

Aerial ladder
A power-operated ladder permanently mounted on a piece of apparatus.

Alarm notification device
An audible and/or visual device in a fire alarm system that makes occupants or other persons aware of an alarm condition

Alarm valve
This valve signals an alarm when a sprinkler head is activated and prevents nuisance alarms caused by pressure variations.

Arson
The malicious burning of one's own or another's property with a criminal intent.

Automatic sprinkler heads
The working ends of a sprinkler system. They serve to activate the system and to apply water to the fire.

B posts
Vertical support members located between the front and rear doors.

Backdraft
The sudden explosive ignition of fire gases when oxygen is introduced into a superheated space previously deprived of oxygen.

Balloon-frame construction
An older type of wood frame construction in which the wall studs extend vertically from the basement of a structure to the roof without any fire stops.

Basic life support (BLS)
Noninvasive emergency lifesaving care that is used to treat airway obstruction, respiratory arrest, or cardiac arrest.

Battalion chief
Usually the first level of fire chief; also called district chief.

Bowstring trusses
Trusses that are curved on the top and straight on the bottom.

C posts
Vertical support members located behind the rear doors.

Class I standpipe
A standpipe system designed for use by fire department personnel only. Each outlet should have a valve to control the flow of water and a 2" male coupling for fire hose.

Class II standpipe
A standpipe system designed for use by occupants of a building only. Each outlet is generally equipped with a length of 1 single-jacket hose and a nozzle, preconnected to the system.

Class III standpipe
A combination system that has features of both Class I and Class II standpipes

Class A fire
Fires involving ordinary combustible materials, such as wood, cloth, paper, rubber, and many plastics.

Class B fire
Fires involving flammable and combustible liquids, oils, greases, tars, oil-based paints, lacquers, and flammable gases.

Class C fire
Fires that involve energized electrical equipment where the electrical conductivity of the extinguishing media is of importance.

Class D fire
Fires involving combustible metals such as magnesium, titanium, zirconium, sodium and potassium.

Cold zone
A safe area at a hazardous materials incident for those agencies involved in the operations; that incident commander, command post, EMS providers, and other support functions necessary to control the incident should be located in the cold zone. This zone may also be referred to as the clean zone or the support zone.

Conflagration
A large fire, often involving multiple structures.

Deck gun
Apparatus-mounted master stream device intended to flow large amounts of water directly onto a fire or exposed building.

Deluge head
A sprinkler head that has no release mechanism; the orifice is always open.

Diking
The placement of materials to form a barrier that will keep a hazardous material in liquid form from entering an area, or hold the material in an area.

Dry-barrel hydrant
A type of hydrant used in areas subject to freezing weather. The valve that allows water to flow into the hydrant is located underground and the barrel of the hydrant is normally dry.

Emergency Medical Technician
EMT-Basics account for most of the EMS providers in the country. EMT-Basics have training in basic emergency care skills, including oxygen therapy, bleeding control, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), automated external defibrillation, use of basic airway.

Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic
An EMT-Paramedic has the highest level of training in EMS, including cardiac monitoring, administering drugs, inserting advanced airways, manual defibrillation, and other advanced assessment and treatment skills.

Engine Company
Engine companies are responsible for securing a water source, deploying hose lines, conducting search-and-rescue operations, and putting water on the fire.

Exposure
Any person or property that may be endangered by flames, smoke, gases, heat, or runoff from a fire.

Fuel
All combustible materials. The actual material that is being consumed by a fire, allowing the fire to take place.

Fuel moisture
The amount of moisture present in a fuel, a factor in how readily the fuel will ignite and burn.

Heavy fuels
Fuels of a large diameter, such as large brush, heavy timber, snags, stumps, branches, and dead timber on the ground; these ignite and are consumed more slowly than light fuels.

Hot zone
The area immediately surrounding a hazardous materials spill/incident site that is directly dangerous to life and health. All personnel working in the hot zone must wear complete, appropriate protective clothing and equipment. Entry requires approval by the IC or a designated sector officer. Complete back-up, rescue, and decontamination teams must be in place at the perimeter before operations begin.

Incendiary fire
A fire that was deliberately ignited under circumstances in which the person(s) knew the fire should not have been started.

Incendiary device
A device or mechanism used to start a fire or explosion.

Level A protection
PPE that provides protection against vapors, gases, mists, and even dusts-the highest level of protection; requires a totally encapsulating suit that includes SCBA

Level B protection
PPE used when the type and atmospheric concentration of substances have been identified. Generally requires a high level of respiratory protection but less skin protection: chemical protective coveralls and clothing, chemical protection for shoes, gloves.

Level C protection
PPE used when the type of airborne substance is known, the concentration is measured, the criteria for using air-purifying respirators are met, and skin and eye exposure is unlikely. Consists of standard work clothing with the addition of chemical-protect

Level D protection
PPE used when the atmosphere contains no known hazard, and work functions preclude splashes, immersion, or the potential for unexpected inhalation of or contact with hazardous levels of chemicals. It is primarily a work uniform that includes coveralls and affords minimal protection.

NFPA
National Fire Protection Association

Overhaul
Examination of all areas of the building and contents involved in a fire to ensure that the fire is completely extinguished.

Shelter-in-place
A method of safeguarding people on a hazardous area by keeping them in a safe atmosphere, usually inside structures.

Size-up
The ongoing observation and evaluation of factors that are used to develop objectives, strategy, and tactics for the fire suppression.

Surface fuels
Fuels that are close to the surface of the ground, such as grass, leaves, twigs, needles, small trees, logging slash, and low brush,; also called ground fuels.

Target hazard
Any occupancy type or facility that presents a high potential for loss of life or serious impact to the community resulting from fire, explosion, or chemical release.

Type I construction
Buildings with structural members made of noncombustible materials that have a specified fire resistance.

Type II construction
Buildings with structural members made of noncombustible materials without fire resistance.


Type III construction
Buildings with the exterior walls made of noncombustible or limited-combustible materials, but interior floors and walls made of combustible materials.

Type IV construction
Buildings constructed with noncombustible or limited-combustible exterior walls, and interior walls and floors made of large dimension combustible materials.

Type V construction
Buildings with exterior walls, interior walls, floors, and roof structures made of wood.
Undetermined fire
Investigators are unable to make a determination based on evidence at the scene and after interviewing witnesses and victims.

Warm Zone
The area located between the hot zone and the cold zone at an incident. The decontamination corridor is located in the warm zone.