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City of Colorado Springs / Frequently Asked Questions / Traffic Engineering

Frequently Asked Questions - Homepage
Traffic Engineering

Q: Do pedestrian indications come up immediately when a pedestrian pushes the push button?

A: No. Timing plans control the points in a traffic signal cycle length when the pedestrian signals activate. Pedestrians input a call to the intersection controller through pedestrian push buttons. At the point a button is pushed, the call for service for the pedestrian is locked into the controller. As with the presence of a vehicle at a side street, side street left turn or main street left turn, the pedestrian call will be serviced at a specific time within a set cycle length. During later evening and early morning times, the traffic signals are set in a very responsive non-coordinated mode, so the time between pushing the button and receiving the "walk" is shorter than during coordinated day time operations.

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Q: Why doesn?t my neighborhood street have speed limit signs?

A: In 2003, the City Council approved the "Citywide 25" ordinance, which states that all streets are 25 mph unless otherwise posted. Thus, if there is no speed limit sign on your street indicating a higher (or, in a few cases, lower) speed limit, then the speed limit is 25 mph.

It is also a function of limited resources. There are more than 5,000 residential streets in the City of Colorado Springs. The City simply does not have the financial or staff resources to post every street with speed limit signs.



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